Top Tips for Soon-to-Be Mums from Care.com

The Duchess of Cambridge has been seen out and about recently with her mum Carole Middleton preparing for the arrival of the third in line to the throne.

Aside from helping to get the essentials required for a new born, Kate will also move back to the family home once the baby is born so that her mum can be on hand to help and support her.

Not all expectant mothers have the luxury of turning to immediate family members for support during the last few months before and after the baby arrives, but help is at hand thanks to Care.com and their resident expert nanny Rosemary Albone, who shares her words of wisdom with mums to be.

The Third Trimester

  1. Don’t Information Overload – It’s easy to spend all your time reading up on loads of information, especially if you don’t necessarily have someone to turn to for advice. Stay informed about pregnancy, giving birth and the care of new-borns, but be careful not to overwhelm yourself with conflicting information.

 

  1. Know Your Hot-SpotsIn terms of tolerating mess and disorder, if you can’t stand the beds not being made then make them, but consciously decide to let other things stay as they are. This is just as relevant once your baby is born.

 

  1. Rally the TroopsIf you are going back to work and have your childcare arrangements sorted, such as hiring a Nanny through Care.com, keep in contact with them and talk about the likely pressure points that might occur in the first few weeks of baby’s arrival and how you are going to manage them together. Things such as managing by yourself when your partner returns to work, and helping with your other children can be all useful topics of conversation.

 

However; it’s not just pre-care help that mums need. The first three months can also be the most demanding, whether you’re a new mum or a mum with several children.

The First Three Months

  1. Double Means Less Trouble – Doubling up on some of the essential baby items can be very beneficial and reduce stress. Have nappy changing items and equipment upstairs and downstairs. Or, keep toys in different rooms around the house so that they are within easy reach.

 

  1. Own Your Diary Don’t feel that you need to ‘host’ visitors all the time when a new-born arrives. By all means, let people come and introduce themselves to the new addition to the family, but make sure it’s on your terms. And if they offer to, suggest they bring their own food so you can focus on what matters most…your new bundle of joy!

 

  1. Get the Family Involved – If your parents are local and willing to get involved, welcome that, but be clear about things you’d like them to help with and those you and your partner would rather do. This also applies if you have a Nanny or another form of childcare. Care.com encourages parents to set the tone whilst the nanny, who is often seen an extension of the family, will work very closely with the parents to create a care plan that benefits the whole family.

-Ends-

Notes to Editor

Rosemary Albone is Care.com’s resident expert nanny. Norland-educated, she has over 20 years’ experience in childcare and early years education and training. She is now an exclusive advisor for Care.com and is using her vast knowledge to help Care.com offer the best possible service for parents in the UK, frequently developing tips, guides and training for other child carers.

 

For more information, visit https://uk.care.com or call Nicole Taylor 0203 047 4035 or email nicole.taylor@edelman.com.

About Care.com

Launched in the U.S. in 2007, Care.com (www.care.com) is now the largest online care destination in the world with 8 million members spanning 16 countries, including theUnited Kingdom and Canada, as well as Germany through the acquisition of Berlin-based Besser Betreut, now a Care.com company. Care.com enables families seeking care to connect with millions of care providers, share caregiving experiences and get advice. The Company helps families address the unique lifecycle of care needs they go through -child care, including special needs, elder care, pet care,housekeeping and more. Care.com is also unique in the scope of services it offers its members. Through its US subsidiary, Breedlove & Associates, members have access to the largest provider of comprehensive household payroll services in the United States, and through its recent acquisition of Boston-basedParents in a Pinch, families and corporations can utilize the expertise of a recognized leader in in-home back-up childcare and adult care. In the UK, Care.com also provides tools and resources to help families make safer and more informed decisions throughout the search and hiring process, including monitored messaging, background check services, and an online safety guide. Fortune 500 companies, educational institutions, technology companies, and professional services firms offer Care.com memberships as a benefit to employees through its Workplace Solutions program.

In 2012, Care.com began to expand its service internationally, launching Care.com UK and Care.com Canada, as well as acquiring Berlin-based Besser Betreut, the largest online care portal in Europe.

Care.com does not employ, recommend, or endorse any caregivers or care seekers nor is it a recruitment or other agency. Care.com provides information and tools to help members make informed decisions.  However, members are solely responsible for selecting an appropriate employer or caregiver for themselves or their family, and employers are solely responsible for obtaining and reviewing any necessary DBS, CRB or other identity, verification, background, or reference checks before hiring a caregiver and for verifying the age of the caregiver they select, as well as that caregiver’s eligibility to work in the UK.

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